I’m not going anywhere: Sandi-Moyo

UNDER-FIRE Zanu PF Women’s League deputy secretary Eunice Sandi-Moyo

UNDER-FIRE Zanu PF Women’s League deputy secretary Eunice Sandi-Moyo has declared she is staying put in her office and will not be distracted by sideshows in the form of nationwide demonstrations against her leadership.

By Nkululeko Sibanda

UNDER-FIRE Zanu PF Women’s League deputy secretary Eunice Sandi-Moyo

Zanu PF Women’s League deputy secretary Eunice Sandi-Moyo

Members of the Women’s League staged nationwide demonstrations against Moyo and secretary for finance Sarah Mahoka on Wednesday where they accused the two of fanning tribalism, corruption, mismanagement and plotting to take over the leadership of the wing from President Robert Mugabe’s wife Grace.

Sandi-Moyo and Mahoka were close to the first lady and accompanied her in her nationwide tours since 2014, but have reportedly fallen out with the Women’s League boss, hence the demonstrations.

Ahead of the Zanu PF conference in Victoria Falls in 2015, Sandi-Moyo was very vocal in pushing for the quota system. The Women’s League wanted one of the state vice-president’s posts to be reserved for a woman amid reports she was lobbying for Grace while setting the stage for Vice-President’s Emmerson Mnangagwa’s demotion.

Mahoka was also doing Grace’s bidding.

She made headlines in February last year when she taunted Mnangagwa in the presence of Mugabe and thousands of party supporters at a Women’s League rally which was broadcast live on national television ZBC. Mahoka challenged Mnangagwa to come clean on his presidential ambitions, before equating his silence to a duck, which takes no action even when its ducklets are attacked. She shocked many by stating Mnangagwa risked dying if he does not rein in those campaigning for him to succeed Mugabe.

Sandi-Moyo, who opened a Twitter account yesterday, told journalists in Bulawayo there were people bent on driving a wedge between her and her boss. She said she had spent her time accompanying the First Lady on her whirlwind tour of the country’s provinces, hence she had no reason to be seen fighting her now.

“What you saw on national television is a sign that there is someone somewhere who is trying to create a wedge between me and the First Lady,” a teary-eyed Sandi-Moyo said.

“This is just someone who wants to create a rift between me and the first lady. I want to tell that person that I am not moved at all. If the president still wants me I will continue with my job,” an emotionally-charged Sandi-Moyo said.

She added she had been a “loyal” aide to the First Lady and had no reason to want to wrest power from her.

“I am 70 years old now. I don’t have a reason to be fighting for posts. I have done my part. I am satisfied with what I have done and if the president says I should go and rest, I will take it because I have played my part,” she added.

Sandi-Moyo charged there were male elements in Zanu PF’s main wing that were fuelling the tensions and demonstrations that rocked the Women’s League on Wednesday.

“We want to see where those that are fuelling these things want to take the party. I understand there are men who are also busy with whatever they are busy with. Some are busy looking for funding to fund all this confusion.

“This thing (demonstrations) has its own owners and they are busy running with it. It would be interesting to see what becomes of their project in the final analysis,” Sandi-Moyo said.

She said she owed her political life to Mugabe, who has the final say on appointments.

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